Satellite Communications: Getting it Installed on your Boat

As you accumulate all of the necessary supplies for your next and ongoing voyages, you have undoubtedly already acquired or are planning to invest in a satellite communications package. The following are the critical points to consider when selecting equipment and preparing it for the installation.

Line of sight. This is the most important concept to understand with satellite communications. All satellite communications networks have at least one common fundamental: the satellite phone has to have a direct line of sight with the satellites. The satellite RF signal will not travel through dense objects (such as a bulkhead, ceiling, wall, etc.), so this means that to use your satellite phone, you must either be outside or have a remotely located external antenna in place. The former is pretty self-explanatory, so I will address the latter by outlining the necessary components for this type of installation.

  • External Antenna. Using your satellite phone inside while maintaining line of sight with the satellites is as simple as installing an externally mounted antenna. Both Iridium and Globalstar have orbiting satellite constellations, so the antenna should be positioned in a location that will offer it the most panoramic exposure to the sky. The antennas are passive, so they have no moving parts, rather, they are designed to cover a broad look angle in all directions for maximum satellite visibility. Antenna height is not important in and of itself unless it is for the purpose of getting it above a potential obstacle, such as a bulkhead. Also, you generally want to keep the antenna at least two meters away from any other RF antennas, particularly radar. A satellite antenna can me mounted on the mast, however, a rail mount is also very common. Most marine antennas have a standard 1” diameter female pipe thread, and there are many different 1” adapters to choose from at your local marine supply store. Marine rated satellite antennas are hermetically sealed and designed to be continuously exposed to salt-fog, moisture, and UV. The only point of moisture entry is the cable connector, so it is recommended to use a marine rated dressing on the connector followed by a good tape job.
  • Antenna cable. For an external antenna to work, you must run the correct type of antenna cable from the antenna to the phone or docking station. With Iridium, it is typically a single cable run. The exception is in the case of a dual mode antenna and a 9575 model phone. A dual mode antenna has both Iridium and GPS elements built in, giving you both signals off of a single antenna. A dual mode antenna requires two cable runs—one for the Iridium signal and one for GPS. The GPS signal feeds GPS coordinates to the phone for the purpose of using the SOS and tracking features on the 9575. Globalstar always requires two cables traveling from the antenna to the phone’s docking station. The overall length of the cable determines the cable stock required in order to remain within the dB loss spec for the satellite signal. A qualified satellite equipment provider will supply you with the correct cable and connector combination for your system, so all you need to worry about is mapping out your cable run and then determining the necessary cable length. And keep in mind – the shorter the cable run the better!
  • Docking Station. In the case of Iridium, when using a remote antenna, you have the option of using the basic antenna adapter that comes with the phone, or the much preferred option of using a docking station. There are several docking station models available for Iridium phones, but they all commonly provide the four basic functions: a secure place to dock the phone, power supplied to the phone keeping it charged, antenna cable connection to the phone, and a data port interface. Depending on the docking station model, some may include additional features such as an RJ11 port, audio input/output, and Bluetooth. With Globalstar, there is one docking station model available and it comes as a package that includes the antenna and antenna cable. When ordering a Globalstar docking station kit, all you need to do is specify the marine antenna and desired cable length. Most docking stations require a 9-32VDC power source and are typically hardwired to your boat’s DC power supply. The overall advantage of a docking station, besides the inherent purpose of using it with an external antenna, is that you have a clean, streamlined, and durable installation, yet within seconds you can deploy your phone from the dock for general use off of the boat or in an emergency situation.
  • WiFi. A wireless data connection from the satellite phone to a computer, tablet, or smartphone can be achieved by adding a simple, but specialized wireless access point. The Sidekick, by OCENS, is specifically designed to interface with satellite phones. It is an optional item for use with computers, but necessary for smartphones and tablets. With a computer, besides being a wireless connection, it is largely beneficial because it eliminates the need for finicky USB drivers since the computer only has to make a standard WiFi network connection. The Sidekick is “plug-and-play” and compatible with all satellite phone models, so to install it, you simply connect it to the USB port on the phone or docking station. For power, the Sidekick requires a standard 5VDC USB power source via its micro USB port.

Installing an effective satellite communications system is not a daunting task once you understand the core components of the system and how they interact with each other. A “do-it-yourselfer” can confidently take on this job him or herself or at least understand the process before hiring a marine electrician to perform the installation. Take your cruising to the next level by leveraging the power of modern satellite communications networks.

About OCENS. OCENS has been providing satellite communications, weather, and email solutions to the marine and other industries for the past 20 years and has established a reputation of providing consistently high-quality support to all of its clients. Please contact OCENS with any questions or concerns related to satellite communications applications.

Firmware Updates

From time to time satellite phone manufacture’s & carriers come out with updates to their devices. These updates are called firmware updates since they change the devices core functioning software. The updates can do anything from fix bugs found in the previous firmware release(s) to adding new features & tools. Running an outdated firmware means you’re not only missing out on these updates, but can also produce incompatibilities with value-add equipment like docking stations.

As of May 25, 2016 the following are the current firmware versions for these common satellite products:

  • Thrane & Thrane Sailor FleetBroadband – v 1.22
  • Thrane & Thrane Sailor IP Handset –          v 1.17
  • Skipper FleetBroadband 150 –                    v 1.7.0
  • Hughes BGAN 9202 –                                 v 5.8.3.2
  • Hughes BGAN 9201 –                                 v 3.8.1.1
  • Sabre 1 BGAN –                                          v 14.5.1
  • Safari –                                                        v R0.2.0.0
  • iSavi –                                                         v R0.1.1.0
  • Thrane Explorer 700 –                                v 3.08
  • Thrane Explorer 710 –                                v 1.06
  • Iridium Pilot –                                              AO12003
  • Iridium 9575 –                                             HL15002
  • Iridium 9555 –                                             HT15002
  • Iridium GO! –                                              v 1.4.1
  • Inmarsat IsatPhone Pro –                           v 5.11.0
  • Inmarsat IsatPhone Pro 2 –                        v 2

Listed below are the websites where the latest firmware is available. Always consult your owners manual for the steps to take to check the firmware of your satellite device, as well as the procedure on how to update it. Of course, always feel free to contact OCENS if you need any assistance.

INMARSAT

FleetBroadband

http://www.inmarsat.com/support/fleetbroadband-firmware

BGAN

http://www.inmarsat.com/support/bgan-firmware

ISatPhonePro

http://www.inmarsat.com/support/isatphone-pro-support

ISatPhonePro 2

http://www.inmarsat.com/support/isatphone-2-support

IRIDIUM 

9575:

Firmware Version HL15002 for the Iridium Extreme 9575

9555:

Download Iridium 9555 Firmware Upgrade and Instructions

GO!:

Iridium GO! Firmware Version 1.4.1 – Users (ZIP)

BEAM Communications (Inmarsat/Iridium SatPhone Docking Stations)

http://www.beamcommunications.com/common-resources

NOTE- BEAM firmware is located on the support page for each individual BEAM product associated with this link.

 

 

Satellite Tracking Platforms

An attribute inherent in most satellite communications devices is the ability to use them for asset/personnel tracking. I will discuss the various satellite communications platforms and how to implement tracking with each one.

First is a brief summary on how tracking works. The device used for tracking needs to be able to perform two basic functions: 1) acquire a GPS position and 2) send the position report to the internet. Of course, if the position report is being sent, it also needs to be received on the other end. The internet makes this possible and most tracking platforms are web-based, including our own OTrak portal. The portal will receive the report, and plot each position report on a map, and can also perform a myriad of other functions such as geofencing, alerts, speed changes, altitude, heading, etc.

There are many GSM devices that can be used for tracking, but satellite tracking devices are used when GSM is not available or when an asset moves in and out of GSM coverage in order to provide consistent and contiguous reporting. Satellite devices have coverage virtually anywhere since all they need is a line of sight to the sky.

Within satellite platforms there are many different options, but we can break the whole group up into two broad categories: 1) Tracking as an “add-on feature” and 2) Dedicated tracking devices.

Tracking as an “add-on feature”

Several of the handheld satellite phones and most of the larger satellite terminals have built in tracking capabilities.

Handheld Satellite Phones

The Iridium 9575 Extreme is the only handheld satellite phone that can provide stand-alone automated position reporting. It has a built in GPS engine and uses the Iridium SBD (Short Burst Data) service to send position reports. It can also send reports manually via SMS. The Iridium 9555 is capable of sending position reports, but only in conjunction with a docking station that has a built-in GPS engine, such as the Beam 9555SD-G.

The IsatPhone Pro from Inmarsat, on the other hand, can send manual GPS position reports via SMS as a standalone operation and can perform automated reporting when used with a GPS enabled docking station, such as the Beam IsatDock Drive.

Fleet Broadband

Any of the Thrane&Thrane Fleet Broadband terminals can send automated position reports with the latest firmware version. You simply have to go into the tracking menu  in the User Interface (UI) and configure your terminal to report to the tracking portal and then register your terminal’s IMEI in the portal.

BGAN

Similar to Fleet Broadband, any of the Thrane&Thrane BGAN terminals can provide position reporting simply by setting it up in the UI. The Wideye Safari vehicular terminal can also provide reporting directly via the terminal.

 

Dedicated Tracking Devices

Iridium SBD

Iridium can provide dedicated tracking via its SBD service. Terminals are available from both ASE and Beam. The terminal requires an antenna, of which a large variety exist, and an antenna cable which connects the antenna to the terminal. The antenna needs to be installed so that it will have visibility to the sky and the terminal requires a DC power source.

Isat Data Pro

Inmarsat’s small packet data platform, the IsatData Pro, is also frequently used as a dedicated tracking device. The IsatData Pro is a one-piece terminal with a built in omnidirectional antenna and is available in three configurations: Marine, Vehicular, and Dual-Mode. The Marine terminal is slightly taller and provides lower look angles to account for pitch and roll, whereas the vehicular version has a lower profile antenna. The dual-mode terminal incorporates least-cost-routing with GSM as the primary service and satellite as the failover. The IsatData Pro is highly configurable so can be set up to receive and transmit a large variety of data input.

For whatever your tracking needs are, there is most certainly a solution to fit them. If you already have a satellite device and are not using it for tracking, then there is more than likely a way to utilize it as a tracking device in addition to any of the other functions it performs.

Please contact OCENS for more information and to get help with setting up your tracking services.

 

 

Tricks for your Mac – Turning of Bonjour

When the French say “Bonjour” it means “good day”, but when Apple says “Bonjour” over your satellite connection it may not be such a “good day”.

“Bonjour is Apple’s implementation of Zero configuration networking (Zeroconf), a group of technologies that includes service discovery, address assignment, and hostname resolution. Bonjour locates devices such as printers, other computers, and the services that those devices offer on a local network using multicast Domain Name System (mDNS) service records.”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

While this “Bonjour” sounds great and does work well when you are connected to a network via a high-speed connection and have other devices that you connect to on that network, it can make your day not so good and cause real frustration when trying to connect to the internet via a satellite phone system.

Bonjour is continually broadcasting information about your device to the network and then listening for what other devices or service are available to connect too. Each time your information is sent your system is using precious megabytes and bandwidth. Not a big deal at home or via a good and inexpensive Wi-Fi connection. But when you are connecting to the internet via your satellite phone you usually doing so via a very slow connection, such as and Iridium phone, and/or are paying a premium for data that is transmitted (i.e. $20 per megabyte for the FleetBroadband systems). Now it does not sound so great.

When you make a connection via your Iridium phone – your Mac is going to see that you are connected to a network and try to find out who is on this network that it can communicate with – this can use up your very limited bandwidth, or pipe if you will, and leaves very little if any room for your weather or email application to transfer its data. What you typically end up seeing is a stalled connection because the data is stuck in the bottleneck of the small pipe and then you receive a time-out error. If you are using one of the higher speed system where you are paying per megabyte – the system is using up data to do this – data for something that you may not care about or realize is being used.

There are a couple ways to reign in Bonjour when you are using your satellite phone.

OCENS software products employ a mechanism that automatically disables Bonjour when you use the dialer in OCENS Mail or WeatherNet so that the data flow is unimpeded by any Bonjour transmissions. When the connection is finished the service is re-enabled.

Another way is to manually disable Bonjour. You can do this by opening the terminal application on your Mac and entering the following command:

sudo launchctl unload -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.mDNSResponder.plist

Then hit enter. You may be required to enter your system password. Bonjour is now disabled.

Bonjour will automatically restart when you reboot your system. To turn this back on without the need to reboot your system you can enter the following command in same fashion as before:

sudo launchctl load -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.mDNSResponder.plist

Bonjour is now re-enabled.

I hope this tip helps you to understand your system a litte bit more.

Bonjour!
Jeff

Handheld Satellite Data: The Importance of Turning Off Internet Applications

A while back, Mark posted a blog article regarding Spyware/Malware and it’s effect on your Satellite connection. If you haven’t had a chance to read it, here’s the link: http://blog.ocens.com/?p=321

Going off this premise, today I’m going to talk about applications that use your Internet connection and their affect on your Satellite data service, ESPECIALLY the handhelds. So first, let’s put these connections into context so it’s something we can understand.

 

Throughput

I apologize in advance… as this will get a little technical, but we will have to pull out some math to explain the underlining concepts.

When talking about files and their size, it’s important to understand the measurement standard used. All data, regardless of what it is, can be broken down to the smallest measurement unit, a bit. A bit is a binary code; think of it as a light switch, it’s either on (1) or off (0) the next measurement up from a bit is a Byte, which is 8 bits. From there, it follows the 1024 sequence of Kilobytes, Megabytes, Gigabytes, Terabytes and so forth:

bit
8 bits = Byte
1024 Bytes = 1 Kilobyte (KB)
1024 KB = 1 Megabyte (MB)
1024 MB = 1 Gigabyte (GB)
1024 GB = 1 Terabyte (TB)

When dealing with a data connection, however, you often hear companies talk about their transfer rate, bandwidth or throughput. This is a measurement of how fast data can be pushed over their service. Think of them as pipes… the faster the throughput, the larger diameter the pipe.

Throughput is measured in how many bits per second you’re able to push across the connection. The abbreviated listing ALWAYS has the “B” in lowercase, which stands for bits, as apposed to the “B” in uppercase, which stands for Bytes. For example, here are some typical connections and their advertised throughput:

Fiber Optic = 1 Gigabit/second [1Gbps] (1,000,000,000 bits per second)
Cable Internet = 30 Megabits/second  [30Mbps] ( 30,000,000 bits per second)
DSL = 7 Megabits/second [7Mbps] (7,000,000 bits per second)
56K Dialup Modem = 56 Kilobits/second [56Kbps] (56,000 bits per second)

Let’s do a little math. Let’s say we have a normal email that we want to send, and we want to attach 3 pictures that total 4Megabytes (MB) the email is fairly large… a page in length, so we will say the measurement of it is 6 Kilobytes (6KB) So, in total, the email size is 4.06 MB (4102 KB) If we break it down to the same measurement as the Throughput (bits) that means the email is 3360584 bits ( 4102 x 1024 x 8 )

Applying the throughput speeds listed, that means the email will take:

.033603584 seconds on Fiber
1.1201195 seconds on Cable
4.800512 seconds on DSL
600.064 seconds on a 56k Modem

So, what about Satellite connections then?

VSAT V3 = 3Mbps (3,000,000 bits per second)
Class 1 BGAN = 492Kbps (492,000 bits per second) (T&T Explorer 700 is a Class 1)
Class 2 BGAN = 464Kbps (464,000 bits per second) (Hughes 9202 is a Class 2)
FBB 150 = 150Kbps (150,000 bits per second)
Iridium 9xxx = 2.4Kbps (2400 bits per second)
Inmarsat ISatPhone Pro = 1.2Kbps (1200 bits per second)

So, that same email would take:

11.20119 seconds on a VSAT V3
68.29997 seconds on a Class 1 BGAN
72.42152 seconds on a Class 2 BGAN
224.0239 seconds on a FBB 150
14001.49333 seconds (that’s 3.89 hours!) on an Iridium handheld
28002.98667 seconds (that’s 7.78 hours!) on an Inmarsat ISatPhone Pro!!

Talk about pushing a watermelon though a garden hose!

Also keep in mind that these are theoretical times, since we haven’t considered overhead data usage to establish and maintain the connection, addressing information, error correction, and other things that occur in a data transfer.

If you take into account issues that can occur like what’s discussed in our blog article Satellite Data Connections Explained (http://blog.ocens.com/?p=296) it’s a feat of engineering that data can be sent at all! And this is just the time spent sending what you WANTED to send… so this brings us to the topic of the article:

 

Applications Internet Usage

Now a day, there are MANY programs running on your computer that utilize the Internet in one way or the other. Operating systems like Windows or Mac OSX use the Internet to pull updates or submit error reports. Internet browsers like Internet Explorer, Chrome, Safari & Firefox use the Internet to pull updates as well. Antivirus programs use the Internet to update their virus definitions. Java and Flash pull updates from the Internet. Even hardware drivers can check into the Internet with the intent to pull updates or submit error reports.

On a typical Internet connection this isn’t an issue, and most of these programs are setup to pull these updates without the need for you, the user, to monitor and initiate them.

It’s important to note however, that they only know is that the Internet is “available” not what type of Internet connection it is.

These updates can range widely in size… anywhere from a couple KB all the way up to major updates (like version changes, or service packs) that can be in the MBs or even GBs!! Imagine pulling down Windows 7’s Service Pack 1 (73.7MB through Windows Update) over an ISatPhone Pro connection…

If any of these programs realize an Internet connection is available, and wants to pull an update on slow connection, it will bog that connection down further or even cause the connection to fail completely (watermelon the size of a house trying to go through a garden hose)

On top of that, if your computer contracts malware, spyware or viruses, they all try to push info over the Internet as well.

Then to compound the issue further, you pay for the usage done on a satellite device; per MB on broadband terminals like the FBB 150 or BGAN, or per minute on handhelds like the Iridium 9xxx or Inmarsat ISatPhone Pro.

 

How To Address These Issues

There are a couple ways to combat the issue of moving data over a Satellite Internet connection.

The first is to make sure your computer is clean of spyware, malware and viruses. You can also go through every application on your computer and verify that they are not set to download updates automatically. Though a tedious process, doing so will GREATLY decrease the amount of data trying to be pushed over your connection.

You can also employ devices like the OCENS Sidekick (http://www.ocens.com/Sidekick-Satellite-Wi-Fi-Router-P760C96.aspx) that employs a firewall and proxy server to manage that connection between your Satellite device and your computer, making sure that only the data you want to send is what gets through.

You can also employ services like WeatherNet, OCENSMail and OneMail to compress the data you’re sending… making it as small as possible to save time & money.

Any and all of these products truly are “Value-Add” services meant to maximize the value a Satellite Internet connection provides, while helping minimize the cost of using them.

 

If you have any questions, or would like to know more about maximizing your satellite connection please give OCENS a call.

Changing Your Signature in iScribe

when OCENS.Mail and iScribe are installed a default email signature is setup to help remind your recipients that you’re connected to a satellite system, and to keep their messages short. If you ever want to change the signature to something different & more personal here’s how to do it:

1. In iScribe go to File & Options
2. in the Options menu screen click on the Accounts tab
3. in Accounts click on the Properties button

From the Account Properties you can change the signature. At the bottom of the window is a Signature XML field that displays the current signature. Just edit that field to display whatever message you desire, then click OK to save it.

That’s it for changing the signature in iScribe. keep in mind that this is just for iScribe, if you use a different email client, like Thunderbird or Outlook, then you will need to look up the procedure for changing the signature within your selected email client program.

Satellite Data Connections Explained

Here at OCENS, we often receive calls from customers having issues using data over their handheld Iridium, Inmarsat, or Globalstar handset. Of these calls, 99.99999998% of the time they end up being an issue with poor signal strength. So, today I thought we should help explain what’s occurring when attempting to use a data service over a handheld satellite phone and what kinds of things can affect having a successful connection.

First, let’s explain the differences between the satellite systems, or “constellations,” as the type of constellation has a lot to do with how your satellite phone interacts with it.

 

Satellite constellations for sat-phone services come in two flavors, LEO or GEO:

LEO stands for Low Earth Orbit and is what Iridium and Globalstar use. In a LEO constellation the satellites are orbiting the planet. Iridium’s constellation, for example, has 66 satellites that polar orbit (on a north-south-north orbit) at a speed of 16,832 mph. At that speed, it takes roughly 100 minutes for any given Iridium satellite to do a complete orbit of the Earth. To help bring this closer to home; at those speeds it means the satellites take roughly 9 minutes to move from horizon to horizon. Suffice it to say, those satellites are moving FAST.

The advantage of a LEO constellation is that you can have truly global coverage. No matter where you are located on the Earth if you have a clear view of the sky you will have a satellite available. The disadvantage, however, is that because the location of the satellites are constantly changing so is the quality of the signal. Also, various elements of the area around you can have a great impact on your signal as the location of the satellites change. We will discuss both of these issues in depth later in this post.

 

GEO stands for Geostationary. An example of a GEO constellation would be Inmarsat’s satellites. Inmarsat’s I4 satellites (providing service to their iSatPhone and FleetBroadband/BGAN systems) are a 3-satellite, High Orbit Geostationary constellation sitting at 22,240 miles above the Earth at the equator.

The advantage of a GEO constellation is that as long as you have “Line of Sight” to one of the satellites, your signal from the satellite is assured. The disadvantages of a GEO, however, are that if you lose “Line of Sight” to the satellite, you will never regain signal until you move to a position where “Line of Sight” is restored. Also, as you move to higher latitudes north or south the angle of your “Line of Sight” drops closer to the horizon and the distance through which your satellite phone must operate to reach the satellite increases.

 

Signal Strength

When talking about signal strength, it’s important to remember that it’s a two-way transaction between the satellite and your satellite phone. The “signal bars” that display on your phone show how well your phone can “hear” the satellite; but they do not, however, show how well the satellite can hear the phone.

When trying to explain the communication relationship between satellites and satellite phones, I like to use a reference involving two people having a conversation. One of those individuals is speaking in a normal tone of voice.  The other has a megaphone. It’s also important to remember that this communication is “Line of Sight” meaning that both parties have to be looking each other in the eye while having this conversation (kind of a funny conversation, isn’t it??)

When signal issues occur, it literally means one of two problems:

  1. Phone can not “hear” the satellite
  2. Satellite can not “hear” the phone

Of those two problems, the MAJORITY of the time it’s because the satellite cannot “hear” the phone because the return signal from the phone is always going to be weaker. Because of this it is much more susceptible to interference.

A popular area where this occurs is in places like a marina where there are an abundance of additional signals occurring within that space: radar signals, RF signals, WiFi signals, and even other satellite devices… all these things can affect the communication between your satellite phone and its constellation. If we go back to our example, imagine a room full of people all talking at the same time and you trying to have a conversation with the megaphone person located on the other side of the room. While you may be able to hear the megaphone clearly, it will be almost impossible to have an enjoyable two-way conversation given the difficulty megaphone man will have in hearing you.

Antenna placement can also affect your signal quality. If you place your satellite antenna too close to something like a radar antenna it’s like trying to have a conversation with a person standing right next to someone else that’s a chatterbox. Now apply the concepts of a LEO, where the satellite (person you are talking to) is constantly moving around the room.  You may be able to barely hear each other while the person is on one side of the room, but as you (or they) move in the direction of the chatterbox, a robust conversation becomes impossible.

 

The Differences between Voice & Data Calls

If you’ve ever called in and talked to one of our technical support people, you’ve probably heard us say that you need “at least 4 bars of signal” when attempting a data call. The reason for this is as follows:

In a voice call, information is sent as it’s created. As you talk, your voice is converted to a signal that’s “streamed” through the system to your recipient on the other end.  Signal strength and quality come into play in how much of your conversation is heard between you and the person you are calling. If you hear words being “chopped off” or “dropped,” or the call itself drops it’s because there is interference. HOWEVER, the over all assessment of the success of your conversation lie with you and your party on the other end. You decide if you understand what’s being said and when to end the call. (The caveat being a complete signal loss, where the call is then terminated.)

In a “Data Call,” however, a whole new set of rules apply. Data is transmitted in containers called “Packets” The majority of data transfers use a protocol called TCP, which stands for Transmit Control Protocol, to send these packets. It’s not really important within the scope of this article to explain all of how TCP works; but what IS important to understand is that this is a two-way rule. When a packet is transmitted, a confirmation is sent from the recipient back to the sender before the next packet is sent. If the sender never gets the confirmation, the connection is considered “Lost” and the data transfer fails. Doing this ensures that all the information requested is received correctly. Applying our example again, imagine having to follow these rules when having a conversation, while also having the “noisy room” conditions explained in the previous section. Kind of a difficult and daunting task, isn’t it?

Because of this TCP rule, signal strength and quality play a MUCH more important role in the ability to transmit data than they do in a voice call. If at anytime one party to a data call does not receive the confirmation it’s waiting for then the TCP rules state that the data is lost.  The data conversation terminates and you have to attempt the data call again, use more of your money, more of your plan’s minutes, and more frustration and headaches. Ensuring that you have the best signal possible when attempting a data call ensures that you have the best chance of making sure both parties in the conversation are able to successfully follow the TCP protocols rules.

 

Hopefully this post helps to better explain what’s occurring when you attempt a data call. If you have any questions, or if you would like to know how to improve your satellite phone’s ability to send data, please give OCENS a call.

Setting up your Iridium 9575 Extreme for SOS messaging

You can easily set up your Iridium 9575 Extreme satellite phone to send an SMS message, email, and call an emergency contact when in the Emergency Mode. Your phone goes into the Emergency Mode when you push the SOS button or manually select it from the phone’s menu. The following are the instructions on how to set up your 9575 phone for emergency messaging.

1. From your phone’s main screen, select Menu.

2. Select Setup

3. Select Location Options

4. Select GPS Options

5. Select GPS Update Options

a. Select the updating frequency you would like

b. Go Back to Location Options

6. Select Emergency Options

7. Select Emergency Actions. Select if you would like to Message and Call, Message Only, or Call Only.

8. Select Emergency Beep. Enable Emergency Beep if you would like the phone to beep while in Emergency Mode.

9. Select Message Recipient

a. Highlight the first entry and Select Options

b. Select Edit

c. If you would like to send an SMS message:

i. Select Enter Number

ii. Enter the emergency contact phone number you would like to send the SMS  message to when in Emergency Mode. Remember to always precede the phone number with 00 or the + sign, then the country code.

iii. Select OK

d. If you would like send an email:

i. Select Edit

ii. Select Enter Email

iii. Enter the email address of your emergency contact

iv. Select OK

e. Fill in the other two emergency contact entries if desired

f. Select Back

10. Select Call Recipient

a. Enter the phone number for the emergency contact you would like to call when in Emergency Mode. Remember to always precede the phone number with 00 or the + sign, then the country code.

b. Select Save

 

Now you are all set up to use the Emergency Mode on your Iridium Extreme 9575 phone!

OCENS.Mail Service for Apple iOS and Android Devices

 

OCENS always strives to provide easy-to-use value-add services for use with your satellite system. OCENS.Mail was designed with that ideal in mind; to give you a means to inexpensively send and receive email over your satellite system regardless of where you are located or what satellite system you have.

With OCENS.Mail for iOS and Android (empowered by the Optimizer 102) we can now provide you with OCENS.Mail service directly to your mobile devices; giving you the benefit of a truly mobile communications platform without the need for an AC powered computer, cables and precious space.

 

Apple iOS

To setup OCENS.Mail on your Apple iPhone or iPad, follow these steps:

  • Connect your iOS device to a WiFi (non-Optimizer) or cellular network
  • Go to the App Store and install the XGate app
  • After the app is installed open it
  • The initial screen will ask for Full Name, OCENS.Mail username & OCENS.Mail password
  • Once finished, you will be taken to the main Page of the app

Initial app setup

  • Tap Settings
  • Tap Server
  • Select xgate.ocens.net
  • Select port 443 (Unless using the Iridium AccessPoint, then leave it on port 3333)
  • Tap Save
  • Tap Connection in the Settings page
  • Select Network Connection
  • Tap Save
  • Return to the main
  • Tap Mail
  • Tap the arrow button
  • Tap Send/Receive Mail to start a mail transfer
  • The webXacc listings are now updated within the application and can be used

 

Setting up the app to use with a satphone:

  • From the Main XGate screen tap Settings
  • Tap Connection
  • Select your satellite device (use the “webXacc” listings for Optimizer connections)
  • Tap Save
  • Connect to the WiFi network of your satellite device (use the Optimizers WiFi if set to a webXacc setting)

Mail Transfers are done by tapping the arrow button in Mail and selecting Send/Receive Mail.

 

 

 

 

Android

To setup your Android smartphone or tablet, follow these steps:

  • Connect your Android device to a WiFi (non-Optimizer) or cellular network.
  • Go to the Play Store and install the XGate app
  • After the program is installed open it
  • The initial screen will ask for your Full Name, OCENS.Mail username & OCENS.Mail password
  • Once done, you will be taken to the Main Page of the program.

Initial app setup

  •  Select Settings
  • Select Mail Server in settings
  • On the Server drop down, select xgate.ocens.net
  • Change the port from 3333 to 443 (unless using the Iridium AccessPoint, then leave the port on 3333)
  • After those settings have been changed, hit your back button, then the back button again to go to the main page
  • Select mail, then Send/Receive Email
  • Select Send/Receive Email at the top to start a mail transfer
  • Once finished, all the “webXacc” Optimizer settings will be available.

Setting up the app for use with a satellite device:

  •  At the main page select Settings
  • Select connection
  • At the Select Router drop down, choose the entry that corresponds to your satellite service (If using an Optimizer be sure to select the “webXacc” entry for your setup)
  • Connect your Android device to the WiFi network of your satellite device.

Mail Transfers:

To receive and read email:


  • Click on the mail link from the main page
  • Click on Send/Receive Email
  • Click on Send/Receive Email button to start the transfer
  • Once the transfer is finished, hit your back button
  • Click on email
  • Click on the received messages to read them

 

 

To send email:

  • Click on Mail from the main screen
  • Click on Email
  • Click on your device menu button and select compose
  • Write your email then click send
  • Hit your back button to go back to the mail menu
  • Select send/receive email
  • Click on the send/receive email button to start a mail transfer

 

 

 

Tip: How to Export and Import Batches in WeatherNet

This tip applies to WeatherNet 3 as well as previous versions. Consider doing this before upgrading to WeatherNet 3 to preserve your current batches.

  1. In the Library Window, click on Batch > Backup Batches… This will backup your entire list of batches.
  2. The Save As window will pop up. Name your file, and select the Desktop or another destination folder that will make it is easy to find your backup file. Click “Save.”
  3. To import your batches, in the Library Window, click on Batch > Restore Batches…
  4. In the Restore Batches window that pops up, select the backup file that you created and click  “Open.”
  5. Your complete backup batch will now be imported into your current WeatherNet version.